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Can't get enough of those CG125's?? - Page 10 - The Bikeshed Forums

Thread: Can't get enough of those CG125's??

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  1. #91
    Wow, well done for working all that out ha. I was thinking I would have the same problem in trying to do this on my Kawa. However I have the added headache of a 6V system... Keep the updates coming, very helpful for us mear mortals who hate electrics.

  2. #92
    Very impressive stuff, looks like a mind melter.

    And miss game of thrones!? Good luck with that

  3. #93
    I agree! electrics are seriously a Rumsfeldian unknown unknown to me
    Honda CBR600F-X (1999)
    Yamaha YBR125 (2005)

  4. #94
    The seat is done. It took several G&T's over several nights, but we got there in the end.

    1 - After amateurishly layering varying thicknesses of fibreglass over the stupidly humpy frame, I ended up with a real pig of a seat base.

    2 - I cut some old braided fuel line along the length and pushed it onto the edge of the base to get rid of the sharp edge and also to make the bottom appear less wavy.

    3 - I glued a big block of medium density foam to the base. I had a spare piece from when I redid the seats in the back of the van. It was hard scooping out the middle to sit on the hump of the base made by the rear mudguard. I used a can of heavy duty spray adhesive that had been left when next door got the carpet fitters in (not a euphemism for anything).



    4 - I trimmed it down to a shape that I thought suitable, but actually it looked naff, so I just cut it into a rectangle and covered it in a blue yoga mat... (which is apparently waterproof but only time and my arse will tell).

    5 - I then made some templates from a mockup of a seat cover I made in paper. These were transfered onto to some cheapo eBay leatherette. I did try and pleat the top, but only the felty foam scrim pleated and the leatherette just ended up with some crap looking lines. The thread was fine, but none of the classic ribbed look. Just lots of tiny holes perfect for letting rain water in (see point 4). After some more G&T's a plain seat seemed a really good choice.

    6 - Mrs Fury did a surprisingly top notch job of sewing the two sides to the top piece (surprised both of us). I then drilled lots of 4mm holes around the bottom of the base and used 3.2mm x 10mm rivets with some small washers to fix the cover to the base. I was concerned that this would be a struggle, but it was surprisingly easier than my expectation. It took a while and it was still bit of a faff, but it worked. The seat's fine for what it is. It lacks any style. Has no redeeming qualities. It feels adequately soft for a short period of time. It looks like a big black squashed loaf. But hey, it's a seat. A custom seat which I made myself, and having a seat makes riding a bike a load easier.







    So, twelve months later I have completed the (sort of) 'dry build'. It's booked in for an MOT a week on Saturday and all I have to do now is adjust the headlight height and sort out the play in the throttle cable - which I think is due to the Rental Ultra-low handlebars. I'm sure it won't fly through and I'll come back with list of fails and advisories, but it's tantalisingly close now.

    And what have I learnt... well. Never make a seat base out of fibreglass if you can avoid it. In fact, I'd categorically say the first thing I should've done, once the right tank had been chosen, was to buy a quality seat made by a professional, and welded the hoop and mounts using the seat for reference.

    Anyway... here it is, one year old!

    Last edited by scott_fury; 27th-06-2016 at 10:38 PM.

  5. #95
    Nice work bud! I did a fiberglass pan for my 250 as it seemed the best way to make the complex shape I needed but I never considered how I was going to cover it! I ended up using contact adhesive and got in a right old mess! Good luck with the mot mate 👍

  6. #96
    Quote Originally Posted by scott_fury View Post
    The seat's fine for what it is. It lacks any style. Has no redeeming qualities. It feels adequately soft for a short period of time. It looks like a big black squashed loaf. But hey, it's a seat. A custom seat which I made myself, and having a seat makes riding a bike a load easier.
    Haha, that's some quality self-deprecation right there! Chin up, it looks good on the bike

  7. #97
    It passed! I had the carb in pieces on my local petrol station's forecourt at 1am the night before, but when the time came, it did me proud. Was in there for twenty minutes and the MOT dude was surprisingly positive about it. A couple of advisories, like no chain guard and slightly bouncy front forks, but apart from that it was all good. One of the lads who worked there also had a CG125 he was building in a proper cafe racer style - rear hump, clip ons and rear sets, etc - and he recommended 10W40 engine oil and a couple of penny washers in the front forks to stiffen it up a bit. I'm riding the sh*t out of it at the moment though so not sure how I'll get to strip the forks again, but it was a good tip.

    The one thing I had to do, which involved more work than I had anticipated, was shortening the throttle cable to get rid of the excessive play and tidy up the mess between the speedo and headlight. I bought a copper barrel that had a hole for the cable which was countersunk on one end to form a bowl for solder to fill in.



    I cut the cable and the cover to length, fitted the newly cut cable into the barrel and gave it a knock with a punch to fray the ends. This helped to hold it in the barrel and also to allow the solder to completely fill the cable. After coating everything with some flux paste, I used a blowtorch and some thin solder (the sort you get from Craplin) and filled the bowl of the barrel with solder.





    A little work with a hand file and it was nice and round, with a snug fit back into the throttle assembly. So here is my first build on its first ride out of town.



    A ring came loose from one of the indicators, and a nut on one of the cush drive bolts has rounded out so will need replacing, but apart from that nothing big has fallen off yet. Really not happy about the daft mirrors, but for the daily commute they're pretty handy. So is the front mudguard having already been caught out a few times by the summer showers. It refuses to go any faster than 55mph, changing down to first is a bitch, the stock exhaust looks way too long, the tank needs to be smaller, the seat is crap, and everything is rusty but I don't care. I'll ride it like this till the winter comes, then sort out all the things I'm not happy with and get it painted proper. In the meantime, it puts a smile on my face every time I ride it, especially because I built it.
    Last edited by scott_fury; 30th-07-2016 at 09:24 PM.

  8. #98
    Its all about putting a smile on your face! I cant wait till I can get mine started and moving

  9. #99
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Brightlingsea, Essex
    Posts
    124
    Well done Mr fury !
    Like you say, there may be some things you feel may need fettling to your taste but i'm sure you get a buzz every time you ride it thinking .....I built this !
    And of course if you had got everything 100 % to your taste, you wouldn't have anything to do during the winter months!
    Well done again & enjoy it.

  10. #100
    Well done and you're on a good plan with running it round first before you pull it apart.
    It is a nice buzz riding round on something you've put together yourself and seems to build a better "feel" for how your bike works, it's own little quirks.
    PS: 55mph is a decent speed for a stock CG.

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