Thread: Pre inspection on new purchase

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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Pre inspection on new purchase

    Morning all, I am in the process of buying a custom bike and I'm not mechanically minded and need help with a pre inspection service that will see if there's anything that needs doing or flags up something I can't see. Can anyone help or know of anyone who is qualified to carry out these inspections, any help greatly appreciated. Daniel

  2. #2
    Ok, a few questions first.
    What is it ?
    Shop or owner built ?
    Custom frame or modified stock ?
    How long has it been "as is" ?
    How much and what's your budget ?
    Where ?

    With a none standard bike I look at the little bits,the wiring,nuts and bolts etc. Everybody can do the paint and chrome bits ( which often "blinds" buyers) but looking at the details gives you an idea of how well the build was done in the first place. If somebody has put the effort into this they are unlikely to have skimped on the big stuff.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
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    Thanks for replying. Its a Yamaha XS1100 1979, Canary Wharf area. owner built I believe but am new to customs. Its around £2500. Im more worried about the engine and wiring etc as the paint can be done later although its nice black, i know the seller has said the carbs need adjusting, do you know how much that costs to sort, all the best, Daniel

  4. #4
    Hmmmm, "the carbs need adjusting" can mean anything from,
    1. The carbs balancing just to get it perfect.
    2."I've changed the exhaust/air filters and it runs like a bag of sh*t and I've not idea/money to get it sorted".
    3. "The engine and/or electrics are fooked and no amount of "adjusting" will sort it".

    Why hasn't the seller sorted it ?
    Personally, I'd be very wary. It's a 38 year old engine and may take a little bit of home maintenance to keep it sweet. Not something you want if you're lacking in skills.

  5. #5
    Yeah. I'd have to say I agree. If you 're just starting out I'd buy something that is a good runner which you can learn the basics on as you go along.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
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    Cheers buddy, so many things to think about isn't there, thank you so much for your feedback as I don't want to get left with a cashcow

    Thanks mate, really appreciate your feedback too, think I'm going to save a bit more cash and buy from on Bikeshed site and try and do a deal with a known good builder

  7. #7
    Senior Member wisp's Avatar
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    Get one that's fully finished it won't cost much more.

  8. #8
    You don't NEED to buy a pro build and you don't NEED to pay through the nose. There are plenty of people who can "home build" to a high standard but, as I said, the detail often shows up the depth of care. I would alsobe cautious of something that's just been finished, you may end up sorting all the little snags that often appear in the first 1000 miles, not anybodies fault, just little bugs that use exposes. Something that's done a few miles should have the major things sorted.
    Do not get blinded by paint and chrome. You can't polish a tu*d but you can roll it in glitter.